Use the Homegroup Feature in Windows 7 to Share Printers and Files


 

The new HomeGroup feature makes sharing files and printers between Windows 7 machines very easy.  Today we will take a closer look at this new feature to show how easy the sharing process is.

Setting up your HomeGroup

There are several ways to access the HomeGroup feature, go to Control Panel and click on“Choose homegroup and sharing options” or just type “homegroup” without quotes into the start menu search bar.

control panel

Next click on the Create a homegroup button.

create

In the Create a HomeGroup screen select what you want to share with the other machines.

select files

After the group is created you will get a password to access it from the other computers.

pw

After you get the Password you’re brought back to the HomeGroup screen where you can make additional changes if you want.

settings

Connecting to your HomeGroup

On the other Windows 7 computer(s) go into the HomeGroup feature and click to join the group you just created.

Join Group

Enter in the password that was created for the HomeGroup.

enter Pass

When the password is accepted the connection will take place and you’re finished.

login successful

If you don’t want to use a password at all go into the Network and Sharing Center under advanced options and turn off password protected sharing.

offpw

Another thing you might want to do is create a shortcut to the HomeGroup.  I just go into Network and copy the icon to my desktop by Right-Clicking and dragging it.  A more direct approach is to create shortcuts directly to the shared public folders but of course it’s completely up to you.

shortcut

To share a printer make sure to select Printers when creating the group and when you go into Devices and Printers on the Start menu you should see it and can set it as the default if you wish.

printer

This should help get you started sharing files and printers between you’re Windows 7 machines on your home network.

Windows DLL bug hits dozens of apps


Logo of CNET.

Image via Wikipedia

Microsoft confirmed earlier this week that a type of attack mechanism known as ‘DLL preloading’. Malicious code can be planted on a network server making it easier to attack vulnerable systems by fooling users into following malicious Web links or opening
malicious documents.

More Info here from CNET

Windows applications harbor bugs


Computerworld – Microsoft has known since at least February that dozens of Windows applications, including many of its own, harbor bugs that hackers can exploit to seize control of computers, an academic researcher said Sunday.

Image representing Microsoft as depicted in Cr...

Image via CrunchBase

At least 19 of the bugs can be exploited remotely, Taeho Kwon, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of California Davis, said in a paper he published in February and presented last month at an international conference.

Kwon added his voice to a growing chorus of researchers who claim that a large number of Windows programs are vulnerable to attack because of the way they load components.
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